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UMaine Hosts Slovenian New Media Collective
Analog-Digital / Digital-Analog: A Collaboration of Science, Art, and Technology
The Collective BridA, a Slovenian team of new media artists, will spend two weeks on the UMaine campus, Oct. 13-31, conducting workshops and public lectures, and creating a unique new work centered on campus resources in science, art and technology, as well as the immediate geographic area and the culture of the university. 

1st public presentation
Tuesday October 18th 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Arthur St. John Hill Auditorium room 165 of the Engineering and Science research Building.

This presentation will introduce the collective Brida and their work and process to the university and general public.

2nd Public presentation
Thursday October 27th 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Arthur St. John Hill Auditorium room 165 of the Engineering and Science research Building.

This presentation will show the results of their two week work on their creative project. BridA will be working with data and information gathered from Engineering, Atmospheric and Quaternary, Spatial Information and Astronomical Sciences. Researchers in these programs will be meeting with BridA during their stay to  provide the data sets that BridA will use to "visualize science."



"The University of Maine is excited to have the Slovenian Artists Collective 'BridA' on campus creating a unique artistic work that combines scientific data and methods, new media technology and aesthetic form," says Raphael DiLuzio, associate professor or new media and coordinator of the event. "As 'New Visualizers,' their focus is to creatively combine and convert methods, data and other aspects of science, art and technology into an engaging aesthetic visual art form."

BridA will give two public presentations, one as an introduction, and the other showing the results of their work. Their work manifests itself as both digital video and audio and analog painting, determined by the data the four-person group assembles. They also will do a gallery presentation of their final work, which includes analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog paintings, at the Clark House Gallery at 128 Hammond St. in downtown Bangor.

Researchers from Engineering, Atmospheric and Quaternary, Spatial Information and Astronomical Sciences will meet with members of BridA during their stay to provide data sets that BridA will use to "visualize science." According to DiLuzio, one example of BridA 's work is converting scientific data to mathematical equations, then using a computer to designate how paint is applied to canvas.

"It's a unique approach to human-computer interface," says Di Luzio. BridA also converts analog information, that which can be seen, sensed or heard, to digital format, an electronic system of code that represents and reproduces sounds, sights or sensations.

Depending on the outcome of the work, the artists also will present a second exhibit at the Clark House Gallery on Friday, Oct. 28, 5:30-8:00 p.m.

BridA describes its artwork this way: "The sense of transforming gathered information into codified notes or modules is the research of new idiomatic expressions. The sources that would generally be used to form an artwork are mathematically converted into sketches, which are not dependant of our temporary perception and instead are a standardized copy of a chosen source.   

"The main objective of the research is to intentionally alienate ourselves as artists from the direct construction of the art piece by using different intermediaries, in this example they are measurement instruments and certain scientific methods of statistical gathering of data from the surroundings," the group says. "Even though this system might seem limited basing only on the readings we get from the instruments, on the contrary, it gives a completely different view, ultimately the data gathered and elaborated end up forming the artwork that would not be possible in a more classical manner."

Contacts: Raphael DiLuzio, 299-0730, George Manlove, 581-3756

Posted 2005-10-13 23:36:15 by Jon Ippolito
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