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Collaborative Efforts Benefiting the Art Community
By:  Eastman’s Crew     Perta Lehman, Jane Hewes, Renee Young, and Bryan Eastman.


Decentralization has made it easier for artists to breakthrough into the art community and become known; it gives unknown artists the opportunity to show their work. This decentralization is open-source artwork.  Through open-source artwork, one artist is able to make something and then share it with other forum users, who then improve upon it. The positive effects of this collaboration are similar to the those effects seen in open-source programming – the work improves with every person who works on it.









 









Websites such as www.creativecommons.org allow users to download other artists’ work and improve upon it, “Creative Commons helps you publish your work online while letting others know exactly what they can and can't do with your work.”


Creative Commons also states that other people may use sample pieces of images for anything, except advertising.  This protects the original artist’s work from being used by another person for economic gain. (www.creativecommons.org)




Open-source art fights against the copyrighted trend of art that has come before. In the traditional art world, it is very hard to make a breakthrough without connections. With open-source art, anybody can have their artwork seen and their voice heard. Art before has been centralized – one artist creates a piece and copyrights it, preventing others from ever using or modifying that image.  This process stunts creative growth within the art community because one artist cannot draw inspiration from another. This way, art stays the same – it never improves.   The collaborative efforts of open-source art benefit the entire community rather than one person.


Posted 2005-11-08 13:02:07 by Yvette Tardiff
Comments on this story... (toggle all)

How do you find art to remix? [Jon Ippolito, 2005-12-20 16:55:13]

This article makes a passionate case for systems like Creative Commons that allow artists to experience and re-use each other's work. (Though to be sure, some flavors of Creative Commons licenses do allow commercial re-use, as in advertising; it's up to the creator to decide whether to allow that option or not.)

One factor that doesn't get so much attention in this article is how artists low on the totem pole can get attention for the work they are sharing with Creative Commons licenses. It's all well and good to put up your photographs for all to share, but without a centralized gallery to promote them how does your audience find out about your work when you're the 100,000th return on a Google search for "photographs"?

An important area of research today concerns exactly this question--it's one you might want to explore in your future work in new media.

jon


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