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Hackers and humanists converge for U-Me conference
Digital Humanities Week surveys impact of new media on previously non-technological fields

Digital Humanities WeekSEPTEMBER 26-29, 2011. Can a self-published author of a Kindle novel make it to the New York Times bestseller list? Can a small-town archive in Lubec or Lincoln share their history online without in-house digital staff of their own? Can Twitter unseat despots in Libya and galvanize guerrilla gardeners in Los Angeles?

Digital Humanities Week 2011 answers these questions and more for students and academics wondering how their workplace and backyards might be changed by new media.

As part of an ongoing effort to establish connections and collaborations with other fields and departments, the New Media faculty have co-organized this week-long series of events surveying the impact of visual culture on the arts and humanities.

To coincide with Digital Humanities Week, the New Media Department's Still Water lab has produced a news blog featuring stories by digital humanists. Visitors to the site can read, rate, and comment on the stories in a style reminiscent of news recommendation sites like Digg, Reddit, or Slashdot.

This conference falls on the heels of recent connections that the New Media department has made to the sciences. The new department chair, Larry Latour, hails from the Computer Science department; New Media faculty have strong connections with the newly established School of Computing and Information Sciences at U-Me; and the New Media curriculum will soon feature a new Baseline Programming Arc designed to enhance the technical background of all its majors.

In this context, Digital Humanities Week represents a liaison with the other half of campus. To pull off this varied series of events, which include sociologists of Twitter, digital curators, and sustainability gurus, New Media partnered with the departments of History (Liam Riordan), English (Margery Irvine), and Sociology (Amy Blackstone).

Other sponsors of the conference include the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, spearheaded by Scott See; and the Digital Curation program, a two-year graduate distance learning degree coming online in 2012 that will prepare anyone who deals with cultural archives or assets to digitize, access, and preserve them.

For more information, please contact Jon Ippolito via First Class or visit DigitalHumanities.NMDprojects.net.



Updated: 2012-01-01 by Jon Ippolito
Posted 2011-09-27 07:54:18 by Jon Ippolito
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