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NMD 430 Indigenous Media in Spr 2009
Indigenous Media logo

Indigenous Media Course
Tuesdays 2:10-4:40pm
237 Stevens Hall North

Cross-listed as
LIB 500 section 0003 Class number 2156
PAX 495 section 0861 Class number 3510
NAS 401 section 0001 Class number 2791
NMD 430 section 0001 Class number 12217


Open to grad students and New Media & Native Studies undergrads with permission.

To study Indigenous Media is to study what it means to be and become Indigenous, and how and why reclaiming and protecting the ecological "commons," both, bioregional and electronic, and Indigenous and Technological, is essential to the future of Earth. Indigenous Media practitioners explore new political strategies and tools, especially the power of networking like-minded communities for local/global actions and sharing of resources while learning, re-learning, and maintaining social, cultural and ecological practices in their own regions. Conversely, Indigenous Media practitioners are also committed to Indigenous Sovereignty.

This course explores the deep connections among Native wisdom, Permaculture, and the global activism made possible by electronic networks. This semester, we will be focusing especially on structures of kinship, both digital and Indigenous, as alternatives to patriarchal kin structures. Partnering and developing collaborative projects is currently underway with colleagues from Arizona State University.

For more information, please contact gkisedtanamoogk via First Class.