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NMD398 Design Patterns for New Media in Spr 2012


NMD398-0860 (#8677) Design Patterns for New Media
MW4-5:50 | John Bell

Design Patterns for New Media is a hands-on course intended to show you the development patterns used to create several types of new media projects.  A problem that is often faced by students when they jump from homework-scale projects to capstone or real-world projects is that they don't know how to break the large-scale projects down into manageable chunks.  This class demonstrates how artists and coders who have an idea can develop the specific details of production needed to make it real.  Each type of production will be covered in two ways:  a look at a prototypical project that will give you a general background in the area, and a presentation from current NMD capstone students working on their project in the area. The emphasis for this class is on design methods more than it is on final results.

If you take this class you will:

•    Figure out the best way to approach a large project based on its genre and goals and produce a methodological structure for its production.
•    Learn how to effectively research unfamiliar implementation techniques so you can use your ideas to shape your work rather than your technical limitations.
•    Gain a greater understanding of how individual technologies interact to create overall functionality within hardware or software.
•    Develop specific implementation skills in the targeted project genres.

The project types covered in Spring 2012 will include:

•    Augmented Reality – mix the digital with the physical in a cutting edge medium
•    Nonlinear Narrative – games, nonlinear video, and hypertext are all built on stories
•    Online Community Design – different social networks may look the same, but are they?
•    Aesthetic Transformation – there is nothing new under the sun, but we can pretend
•    Interactive Installations – turn viewers into participants…outside of the computer