The Maine Intellectual Commons
The Maine Intellectual Commons
The Maine Intellectual Commons
The Maine Intellectual Commons
Establishing New Standards for Scholarly and Creative Access
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Welcome
The Maine Intellectual Commons is a project of the University of Maine, a national leader in promoting open access to scholarly and creative work. Participants in the Maine Intellectual Commons have established forward-looking copyright policies, proposed new open license terms, and organized important events promoting a commons approach to intellectual property.

Open license workshops from the Conference on the Intellectual Commons
Find out more about its past achievements and current work in progress by choosing a link at left.
ABOVE: Open license workshops from the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.


Sponsored by the University of Maine Information Science Collaborative, Fogler Library, Technology Law Center of the University of Maine School of Law, Still Water and other organizations concerned with preserving and expanding access to digital information.
The price of academic journals is increasing so fast that they will soon be out of reach for all but the wealthiest universities, and scholarly access to digital materials can be restricted by new forms of technological control. Open access journals and repositories offer researchers more options than traditional periodicals and commercial middlemen. But how can faculty satisfy tenure expectations to publish in prestigious journals and yet foster the open circulation of ideas essential to academia?

Robert Kennedy addresses the predicament of today's scholars at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons
The Maine Intellectual Commons tackles this issue by asking whether the criteria for tenure need to change to accommodate the changing legal and economic climate of intellectual property and the increasing diversity of electronic means of scholarly access. For more on the working group addressing this question, click on Work in Progress > Incentives at left.

For more background on the problem and its solutions, see the archived presentations by Hal Abelson, Marilyn Lutz, Jean-Claude Guedon, and Peter Suber from The University of Maine's November 2004
Conference on the Intellectual Commons.
ABOVE: University President Robert Kennedy addresses the predicament of today's scholars at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
Digital tools allow creators unprecedented power to sample and remix art, music, text, and video. Yet the record labels are suing thousands of college students every year, Hollywood has followed suit, and Congress is considering outlawing peer-to-peer networks and other technologies for distributing and accessing culture. Can innovation and intellectual property co-exist in the Internet age?

Neeru Paharia of Creative Commons shows students how to apply open licenses at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons
The open licenses promulgated by
Creative Commons offer one solution to this problem. Click on Work in Progress > Open Licenses at left to learn more about how the University of Maine community is working with Creative Commons and others to craft a special license for stimulating digital creativity.

For more background on the problem and its solutions, see the background link at left or view the archived presentations by Joline Blais, Neeru Paharia, Dylan Suzanne, and Tim Whidden from The University of Maine's November 2004 Conference on the Intellectual Commons.
ABOVE: Neeru Paharia of Creative Commons shows students how to apply open licenses at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
Companies like IBM and Novell, along with governments from Brazil to Korea, have embraced "open source" software development. Authors like Cory Doctorow have spurred book sales by distributing free online copies. High profile firms like Google and Red Hat Linux stay profitable even though their basic product is free. How does open access provide these businesses with a competitive advantage?

Ted Coladarci explains why he chose open access for his journal at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons
Click on Work in Progress > Educating the Community at left to learn more about how the University of Maine community is working to raise consciousness about business models that promote or exploit the benefits of digital access.

For more background on the problem and its solutions, see the archived presentation by Jim Campbell and Ted Coladarci from The University of Maine's November 2004
Conference on the Intellectual Commons.
ABOVE: UMaine Professor Ted Coladarci explains why he chose open access for his journal at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
The field of intellectual property has undergone major seismic shifts in recent years, largely in reaction to the advent of digital technologies.

Joline Blais presents The Pool at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons

To learn more about these new ways of thinking about copyright and access to common culture, click on a subject at left or view the archived presentations from The University of Maine's November 2004 Conference on the Intellectual Commons.
ABOVE: Still Water Co-director Joline Blais presents The Pool at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Justin Russell.
Selected Overviews of Current Battlegrounds in Open Culture
Benkler,Yochai (2002). Coase's penguin, or linux and the nature of the firm. [Electronic version]. The Yale Law Review. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.benkler.org/CoasesPenguin.html
Analyzes the emergence of commons-based peer-production in software development, scientific research, and other cultural practices.
Boyle, James (ed) (2001). Conference on the Public Domain (November 9-11, 2001). Complete Webcast Archive; Selected Papers. Retrieved October 5, 2004, from www.law.duke.edu/pd/realcast.htm law.duke.edu/journals/lcp/indexpd.htm
Delio, Michelle (2003, December 16).  Copyright doesn't cover this site. Wired News. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.wired.com/news/infostructure/0,1377,61585,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_1
A profile of the University of Maine's efforts to build an online environment for sharing art, code, and text.
Greenstein, Daniel (2004, September 10). Not so quiet on a western front. Nature. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from  www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/23.html
Lessig, Lawrence (2004). Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity. [Electronic versions]. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from free-culture.org/freecontent/
Kranich, Nancy (2004). The Information Commons: A Public Policy Report. The Free Expression Policy Project, Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law. www.fepproject.org/policyreports/InformationCommons.pdf
Reshaping Scholarly Communication. Office of Scholarly Communication, University of California. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/
SPARC Open Access Newsletter and Free Online Scholarship (FOS) Newsletter Archive. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/archive.htm
Suber, Peter (2004). Creating an Intellectual Commons through Open Access. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001246/01/suberrev052804.pdf
Suber, Peter. Open Access News; News from the Open Access Movement. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/fosblog.html
Suber, Peter. (2004, September (last revised)). Open Access Overview; Focusing on open access to peer-reviewed research articles and their preprints. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm
Web focus: Access to the Literature: the debate continues. Nature, August 2003-September 2004. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate
Specially commissioned insights and analysis from leading scientists, librarians, publishers and other stakeholders on the future of access to the scientific literature.
Open Access Initiatives
Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) (2003).  Principles and Strategies for the Reform of Scholarly Communication, August 28, 2003. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from makeashorterlink.com/?E2CB21279
Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, October 22, 2003. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from http://www.zim.mpg.de/openaccess-berlin/berlin_declaration.pdf
Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing, June 20, 2003. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/bethesda.htm
Budapest Open Access Initiative, February 14, 2002. Retrieved October4, 2004, from www.soros.org/openaccess/read.shtml
The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). (2004). Statement on Open Access to Scholarly Literature and Research Documentation, February 24, 2004. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.ifla.org/V/cdoc/open-access04.html
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (2004). Declaration on Access to Research Data From Public Funding, January 30, 2004. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.oecd.org/document/15/0,2340,en_21571361_21590465_25998799_1_1_1_1,00.html
UN World Summit on the Information Society Declaration of Principles and Plan of Action, December 12, 2003. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from   www.itu.int/dms_pub/itu-s/md/03/wsis/doc/S03-WSIS-DOC-0004!!MSW-E.doc   www.itu.int/dms_pub/itu-s/md/03/wsis/doc/S03-WSIS-DOC-0005!!MSW-E.doc
Wellcome Trust position Statement in Support of Open Access Publishing, October, 1, 2003. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.wellcome.ac.uk/doc%5Fwtd002766.html
Alternative Publishing Options and Experiments
arXiv e-Print Archive. Cornnell University Library. Retrieved October 4, 2004 from  arxiv.org
Active archive for pre-prints, mainly in physics, mathematics and computer science.
The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.arl.org/sparc/index.html?page=a0
Alternative publishing option to create journals that will compete with specific, highly priced journals.
BioMed Central. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.biomedcentral.com/
A very innovative commercial service that makes refereed journals freely accessible to the world.
Public Library of Science. www.publiclibraryofscience.org/
An agreement by scholars not to publish in journals that do not make their articles freely accessible within six months of publication.
Selected Publications on Scholarly Communications
Crow, Raym (2002). The Case for Institutional Repositories. Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition. Retrieved October 4, 2004 from www.arl.org/sparc/IR/ir.html
Guédon, Jean-Claude (2001, October). Beyond Core Journals and Licenses: The Paths to Reform Scientific Publishing.  ARL Bimonthly Report 218.  Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.arl.org/newsltr/218/guedon.html
Guédon, Jean-Claude (2001). In Oldenburg’s Long Shadow: Librarians, Research Scientists, Publishers, and the Control of Scientific Publishing. [Electronic version]. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.arl.org/arl/proceedings/138/guedon.html
McCabe, Mark (1999, December). The Impact of Publisher Mergers on Journal Prices: An Update. ARL Bimonthly Report 207. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.arl.org/newsltr/207/jrnlprices.html
Creative Commons
Creative Commons Licenses. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from creativecommons.org/
Committee on Licensing Geographic Data and Services. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2004). Licensing Strategies and Decisions. (pp 177-204).  National Research Council of National Academies Press. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.nap.edu/books/0309092671/html/
Creativity and Open Culture
Distributed Creativity: Copyleft, Right, and Center. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from cordova.asap.um.maine.edu/~wagora/w-agora/index.php?bn=distributedcreativity_eyelaw
An online forum produced by Eyebeam and UMaine on legal innovations for stimulating distributed creativity.
Ippolito, Jon. [n.d.]. Why Art Should Be Free. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from three.org/ippolito/writing/wri_online_why.html [A polemic on why property-based art models hurt artists.]
Open Art Network. Retrieved October 4, 2004. three.org/openart
A consortium that aims to empower artists working in digital formats by devising and promoting open standards for networked art.
Scientific and Technical Data
National Research Council (2004). Open Access and the Public Domain in Digital Data and Information for Science: Proceedings of an International Conference. Retrieved October 5, 2004 from www.nap.edu/books/0309091454/html/
National Research Council (2003). The Role of Scientific and Technical Data and Information in the Public Domain: Proceedings of a Symposium. Retrieved October 5, 2004, from www.nap.edu/books/030908850X/html/
Onsrud, Harlan, Camara,G., Campbell, J. ,Chakravarthy, N.S.  [2004, July 5]. Public Commons of Geographic Data: Research and Development Challenges. [Preprint of chapter in a forthcoming book]. Retrieved October 4, 2004, from www.spatial.maine.edu/geodatacommons/PubCommonsSNGL.pdf
Open Access Journals
Directory of Open Access Journals
Print
Print a PDF or HTML version of this bibliography.
The University of Maine has a history of innovation in intellectual property and scholarship. The University's forward-looking copyright policies, novel applications for stimulating online collaboration, and innovative approach to sharing knowledge have attracted attention from experts in open access and national press.

Harlan Onsrud presents University of Maine copyright innovations at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons

In founding the Maine Intellectual Commons, the university is reaching out to include experts interested in broader initiatives that could affect a much larger community.

Find out more about past achievements by choosing a link at left.
ABOVE: Professor Harlan Onsrud presents University of Maine copyright innovations at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
In the late 1990s, the Faculty Senate at the University of Maine was instrumental in developing a policy for the entire University of Maine System that ensures that copyright clearly resides with creators and encourages those creators to place their works in the public domain or open access licensing environments.

The Maine Intellectual Commons group is working to build on this foundational work by refining the language of the original policy to match current legal standards. For more information, choose Work in Progress > Institutional Policy from the links at left.
Copyright, Scholarship, and the Case for Open Access:
A Conference on the Intellectual Commons
Hal Abelson speaking at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons

Saturday, Nov. 20, 2004
University of Maine, Orono

Learn new ways to stimulate and exploit open access to artworks and scholarly publications by reviewing the archived presentations from this conference, which featured such speakers as
ABOVE: MIT's Hal Abelson speaking at the Conference on the Intellectual Commons. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
Working groups have been formed and are working on several suggested actions for the university community that arose from the conference and a follow-up meeting. The groups are largely exploratory and focused on proposal development at this point in time. Whether and how to pursue any recommended proposals arising from the working groups will be addressed in due course.

Open license workshops from the Conference on the Intellectual Conference
Documentation of materials under consideration by each working group is linked from each group as listed in the links at left. Discussions among and across groups are occurring on the Maine Commons Discussion List. You can browse or join this list via the Join the Discussion link at left.

If you wish to join one or more specific working groups, please send a message to the chair as listed in each working group's description at left.
ABOVE: Open license workshops from the Conference on the Intellectual Conference. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following: Chair: James Campbell , campbell AT spatial.maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

The current mission statement of the University of Maine may be found at
www.umaine.edu/mission.htm while a mission statement for the University of Maine System is not readily apparent.
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:
Chair: Jim Bird (jim.bird AT umit.maine.edu) and Sharon Fitzgerald (sharon.fitzgerald AT umit.maine.edu)

View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:
Chair: Harlan Onsrud , onsrud AT spatial.maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

This task has been accomplished largely already for the University of Maine System. However, the current language needs minor changes.

University of Maine System Policy Manual, Section 209 Intellectual Property

www.maine.edu/policysc209.html UMS Full Statement of Policy Governing Patents and Copyrights 2/22/02

"It is the policy of the University that all rights in Copyrightable Works shall remain with the author(s) and creator(s) unless: " (narrowly proscribed exceptions) - most materials created in the normal course of teaching and scholarly work are presumed under the ownership control of the creator
The policy also encourages authors and creators to apply the University of Maine Broad Application Copyleft License (currently identical to "Design Science License")
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following: This might be done by systematically changing all applications for promotion and tenure and all applications for teaching, research, public service and other honorary awards so that:
Chair: Jon Ippolito, jippolito AT maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

Documents that might initially be considered for application of this principle on the University of Maine campus might include the following:
Discussion:
Example: Please list your scholarly publications in each of the following categories. In providing the uniform resource locator (url) where the document may be read in full text, please provide a url where both internal and external reviewers may access the material.
  1. Peer Reviewed Journal Publications
    - citation / url / journal citation index rating or acceptance rate of submissions
  2. Books
    - citation / url
  3. Peer Reviewed Conference Proceedings (based on submission of full paper)
    - citation / url / acceptance rate of submissions
  4. Other Conference Proceedings (based on peer review of abstracts)
    - citation / url / acceptance rate of submissions
  5. Other Publications
    - citation / url
Potentially go further: Scholarship available in a long-term archive that is openly available to the world is presumptively of greater value to society than those items failing to meet these criteria.
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:
Chair: Marilyn Lutz , marilyn.lutz AT umit.maine.edu

View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

SPARC and others have prepared sample statements that may serve as starting points.
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:

Chair: Burt Hatlen, burt.hatlen AT umit.maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

Facilities already exist on campuses for aiding faculty in dealing with technology. By example, on the Orono campus, the Faculty Development Center and Fogler Library regularly offer short courses on learning how to accomplish specific software or data processing tasks.
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:

Chair: Justin Hafford, justin AT umit.maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

Maine Intellectual Commons members have written open letters in support of the 2006 Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA). More at the Maine Intellectual Commons Maine Intellectual Commons Education Wiki..
The goal of this working group is to explore and propose one or more specific options for accomplishing the following:
Chair: Jon Ippolito, jippolito AT maine.edu


View the current deliberations on this topic.
Background Documents:

UMaine's
Still Water group, has proposed this new license to Creative Commons and is in the process of drafting the legal framework as well as creating an inventory of sample applications accessible through the Open Art Network.
An open e-mail discussion list has been established to facilitate the discussion of actions that might expand access to the scholarly materials produced by faculty, staff and students within the University of Maine System.

You may subscribe to the list at lists.eogeo.org/mailman/listinfo/maine-commons.

Allan Doyle, Jim Campbell, and Hal Abelson at the Conference on the Intellectual Conference
Once you are subscribed you will receive a confirmation message to which you must reply. After that you will receive email messages sent to the list by other subscribed members and you will be able to send mail to the list from your subscribed email address.

Please avoid using HTML formatted email when sending mail to the list. The list archives will "scrub" HTML formatting to prevent potential security problems with HTML content. Please also avoid sending attachments since not all subscribers, such as those in rural New England, are likely to have inexpensive or high-speed connections.

We hope this discussion list enables you to more actively engage with others in addressing the pressing issue of expanding access to the scholarly literature at a time when restrictive license terms and spiraling journal costs are reducing our campuses ability to provide students and faculty with the full range of scholarly materials they need for learning and research.
ABOVE: Allan Doyle, Jim Campbell, and Hal Abelson at the Conference on the Intellectual Conference. Photo by Bill Kuykendall.
The Steering Committee for the Maine Intellectual Commons includes: Working Group chairs also include: Institutional sponsors include: and other organizations concerned with preserving and expanding access to digital information.

Web site by Still Water.


UMaine Logo
University of Maine School of Law logo
Still Water logo
To find out more about the Maine Intellectual Commons Initiative, please contact Jim Campbell:

campbell AT spatial.maine.edu
address and phone to come
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